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American Sign Language:  "girl"



Place the tip of your thumb on your cheek.  Slide the tip of the thumb forward and down along the cheek.  
Memory tip:  Girls used to wear bonnets that they tied under their chin.  [You might want to visit the BOY/GIRL "tour" page for more information.]

GIRL:


    
 


Little-girl:
Tip: think of the height of the boy or girl.


 


ALSO SEE:  WOMAN



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Optional Reading:
In a message dated 2/10/2006 7:32:25 PM Pacific Standard Time, DJ3262 writes:

Hey Dr. Bill,
I got the book Linguistics Of American Sign Language 4th edition. I don't know whether you have it or not. Very good and interesting. A few things, though. This book mentions that the sign for girl is repetitive. Where did they get that from? I couldn't find that in my dictionary or on your website.
Thanks.
--Douglas

Dear Douglas,
You will find that many Deaf people sign "GIRL" with a single movement.
It is the same with the sign "BOY." Some people do the sign "BOY" with a double movement, some do a single movement.
When "GIRL" is signed as part of a compound like "GIRL-FRIEND" you should certainly use a single movement.
I find that the "double movement" tends to show up more when the sign BOY or GIRL is being used as a single sign response to a question. 

For example: 
Signer one:  JENNY BORN FINISH? (Did Jenny give birth yet?"
Signer two:  GIRL! (double movement).

As you study, keep in mind these two guidelines:
1. There is a great deal of variation out there in the "real world."
2. American Sign Language, like all living languages, is constantly evolving.

-- Dr. Bill