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American Sign Language:  "noise"

 


The sign for noise in ASL is done by pointing to (or touching) your ear and then shaking your hands a couple of times.
 

NOISES:



 



"Last night the thunder and lightening was very loud and noisy!"
Note: If you ask ten different people to sign this sentence for you you will invariably get ten different answers.  How do I know?  I've asked many dozens of people to sign it.  For what it is worth, I'll show you my variation.
Note  the difference between "noisy" and "thunder."


Notes:  I sign "PAST / before" to mean "last" in this sentence.
For THUNDER, I point to the ear then I use a firm converse double movement with both hands using "handshape: 5."

For LIGHTENING, I make a downward  zigzagging movement with index fingers.
For "very" I did the sign "OOH" which uses an intense facial expression and the dominant hand in a claw shape making shaking movement in front of the lower face.

For LOUD, I point to the ear then I use a firm converse double movement with two hands using "handshape: S" on each hand.

For NOISY, I point to the ear then I use a simultaneous twisting movement of both hands using "handshape: 5."
 

If you wanted, you could have a lot of fun and/or get into a lot of heated arguments over the "right way" to do the sentence:  "Last night the thunder and lightening was very loud and noisy!" Realistically though, there is no one right way -- just a lot of varying ways. What I've shown you above are some "good ways" that should fill your need until you find a "better way."
Good luck  :)

 


Also see: LOUD


 


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