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Lesson 37:

Resources:
Level 03 (Lessons 31 - 45) Practice Cards (in MS Word .doc format)

Vocabulary:

AGAINST-[opposed/anti/con]
ALLOW-[permit]
CHEAT
COCHLEAR-IMPLANT
CONFLICT
DESTROY
DO-[behavior/action]
DUTY
FIX-[#FIX]
INVESTIGATE-[RESEARCH, check]
LECTURE-[speech, give-a-talk]
MAYBE-[may, might]
OF-(join, member, own)
PRISON-[jail, in-jail]
SAVE
SHOCKED
STEAL
SUSPECT-[suspicious]
THIEF
WEAR-OUT-[burnout, fall-apart]

 

Practice sheet 37.A
01. COCHLEAR-IMPLANT, YOU AGAINST?
02. SUPPOSE SHIRT NONE, SHOES NONE, STORE ALLOW YOU ENTER QM-wig?
03. SUPPOSE STUDENT CHEAT TEST, YOU THINK SHOULD THROW-[cast-out] SCHOOL?
04. YOUR GOAL, YOUR FATHER, HIS GOAL SOMETIMES CONFLICT?
05. CAT LIKE DESTROY FURNITURE, WHY?

 

Practice sheet 37.B
06. D-O how-SIGN?
07. DOCTOR DUTY WHAT?
08. CAR MOTOR, CAN #FIX YOU?
09. RESEARCH PAPER, YOU ENJOY WRITE?
10. YOU LECTURE CL:55-[large_audience] PAST YOU?

Practice sheet 37.C
11. NEWS ARTICLE YOU CLIP-OUT SAVE-[retain]? 
12. SUPPOSE YOUR MOM PRISON, YOU SHOCKED-[brain-freeze] YOU?
13. SOME PEOPLE STEAL, WHY?
14. YOUR MOM HIDE DRINK-[alcohol], SUSPECT YOU? (Do you suspect your mom is a closet drinker?)
15. YOU THINK THIEF SHOULD JAIL 30 YEAR?

 

Practice sheet 37.D
16. YOUR SHOES, WEAR-OUT HOW-OFTEN?
17. YOU THINK FUTURE-[someday] YOU MAYBE BECOME NURSE?
18. PRISON, YOU THINK SHOULD BUILD MORE?
19. MAINSTREAM YOU?  (Were you mainstreamed into a public school?)
20. WORK YOU what-DO? 
 



NOTES:

CLIP-out: The sign "CLIP-out" can be done by using your index and middle finger like a pair of scissors. Use your "scissors" to cut around the perimeter of the article. Ha! Time passes quickly eh? Almost nobody clips out news articles any more because few people read "paper" based news any more.  I'm going to leave this in the curriculum for a while though since the individual signs in that sentence are still fairly common in other usages and thus are good practice.

SCADS: The SCADS sign which uses a "classifier: bent-5" handshape can be used to mean almost any large group of people, animals, or things. Using an intense facial expression modfies the sign to mean a truly "huge" amount. The sign "scads of" can be done by forming palm down somewhat flattened claw shapes, and moving the hands forward while using an intense facial expression.

 

Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf: A widely recognized certification granting organization for Interpreters for the Deaf.

Degrees of Hearing Loss: Profound, severe, moderate, mild.

Titles of Address / DOCTOR vs "Dr.": 
There is a difference between the sign for a medical doctor and an the designation "Dr." as in an "academic" doctor.  While the Deaf community is not overly concerned with titles, if you are introducing someone who holds a doctorate to an audience you would simply spell the letters "D-R" and then the name.
In most everyday communication we don't use titles. We tend to use name signs instead.

MACHINE / "multiple meaning signs": These concepts all use the same sign: motor engine factory machine

PUBLIC-[culturally-hearing] SCHOOL YOU? (Did you go to a public school?)
 

MAINSTREAM YOU?  (Were you mainstreamed into a public school?)

 

PARANOID: Place the tip of the middle finger of a "K" hand on your temple and twist your hand a couple of times.

PRISON: "Prison" and "jail" can use the same sign. If you need to make a distinction you can do JAIL with "V" hands and PRISON with "4" hands.
 



Question: 
How do you sign a yes no question that ends in "MAD?"

Response: 
Sometimes the yes/no question facial expression is more important than the emotion facial expression.  For example, in the question, "Are you mad?" you would sign "YOU MAD" while using raised eyebrows and a question expression rather than furrowed eyebrows and a mad expression.

Of course it would be relatively easy and perfectly acceptable to sign:  "YOU MAD, YOU?" and use a "mad" facial expression while signing "MAD" and then raise the eyebrows for the sign YOU.

 



Question: 
Why do deaf people have signs for MUSIC, and LOUD?

Response: 
Being deaf doesn’t mean you are "totally" incapable of hearing anything.  Being "deaf" means you are not able to use your sense of hearing for everyday communication purposes.  (Note: Some authors prefer to lower case "deaf" when talking about physical deafness and uppercase Deaf when talking about people who are culturally Deaf.  Some authors prefer to capitalize Deaf at all times.)

"Hard of Hearing" people are generally able to understand most everyday voiced conversations IF there isn't much background noise or other interference.

To better understand what it is like to be deaf, let's consider "blindness."

At what point does a person become blind?  When everything is black?

No…legal blindness starts at a vision acuity of 20 / 300 -- meaning such a person can see at 20 feet what a person with 20/20 eyesight can see 300 feet away.
At some point a person's vision becomes so impaired that it really doesn't help them much in their everyday life.  At that point they are not just "legally blind" but rather they are "blind."

Also some people have tunnel vision, which is to say they can only see things within a limited range of vision.  Other people are color blind or tint blind which means they see shapes and contrasts just fine, but not color or not certain shades of color.  Some people who can't see well in dim light can see just fine in bright light.

Hearing loss works the same way. Some deaf or hard of hearing people can hear at 2 feet away what could be heard at 30 feet away by a person with normal hearing. Or it might be more complex.  For example, my hearing chart (audio-graph) shows that on the very high and very low tones I hear almost normal -- but not very well at all for the  in the middle ranges (which are conversational tones).  That means I can hear foot taps and can know if my students are talking but often not catch the actual words that they are saying.


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End of lesson.  Please move on to the next lesson.


Curriculum revision notes and lesson archive:
In a never ending effort to improve, this website is under constant construction.  Below may be sentences, signs, or other material that is being phased out of this lesson as well as other material that may be phased into the lesson:

 

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