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Lesson 25:

Objectives:
Discussion topic:  Adverbs in ASL
Discussion topic:  Conceptually Accurate Signs  
I have taken the Lesson 25 Vocabulary Practice Quiz
___ I have taken the general practice quiz for this lesson.  See: PRACTICE QUIZZES

Vocabulary:
area
BRING-[carry]
COME
DON'T-MIND
EXACT
EAST
FAR-(versions)
FAST-[speed, immediately, quick] (versions)
FIELD-[all-over, -dom, -hood, land, area, -ground]
FRONT
GO
HURRY-[rush]
LEFT
MOVE
NEAR-[close]
NORTH
PARKING-LOT
perfect
PLAY
RIGHT
SOUTH
WEST
WOW (versions)


Practice sheet 25.A
01. 5-DOLLAR, DON'T-MIND LEND ME? (Would you mind lending me $5?)
02. C-H-E-S-S, YOU LIKE PLAY?
03. YOU LIKE GO PLAY-FIELD? (playground)
04. WANT GO MOVIE YOU?
05. Every-MORNING, YOU HURRY-[rush] SHOWER, CLOTHES, EAT, GO-[take-off] SCHOOL YOU?

Practice sheet 25.B
06. BOX BRING CAR DON'T-MIND?
07. HOW YOU SIGN L-E-F-T?
08. HOW YOU SIGN R-I-G-H-T?
09. UP-TO-NOW, YOU MOVE HOW-MANY TIME?
10. FOOD STORE, YOU LIVE THEREABOUTS?

Practice sheet 25.C
11. PARKING-LOT SUPERVISOR EARN A-LOT?
12. YOU LIVE NEAR SCHOOL?
13. YOU PREFER LIVE NORTH OR-[bodyshift] SOUTH?
14. YOU WANT ME SIGN FAST?
15. YOUR EXACT ADDRESS WHAT?

Practice sheet 25.D
16. YOUR HAIR, WOW, DO-what ?
17. YOUR HOUSE HOW FAR?
18. YOUR HOUSE, FRONT DOOR, what-COLOR?
19. YOUR LAST NAME, HOW SPELL?
20. YOUR MOM ADDRESS WHAT?


Review:  THEREABOUTS


Signing notes:  On the sign "MOVE" You can move the sign "MOVE" from place to place randomly to show that a person is moving from place to place.
 


Sample activity:  Lesson 25 cumulative >


Discussion:

In general we don’t use the sign “DO” as in “DO you like Ice cream.”  Instead we just raise our eyebrows while signing "YOU LIKE ICE-CREAM?"

There is a separate sign for the phrases “What are you doing?” “What did I do?” “What will we do?” It is called the "what-DO?" sign. That sign is sometimes written as "DO-DO."

The sign: SUBSCRIBE/ssi/dole/welfare can refer to subscribing to a magazine or newspaper as well as to getting a check from the government.

Adverbs in ASL:
An adverb modifies the meaning of a verb, adjective, or other adverb.  ASL uses a number of methods to modify the meanings signs.  You can modify the speed and direction of the sign.  This is called "inflecting" the sign.  For example, suppose you do the sign "SLOW" in a very slow manner, it could be interpreted as "very slow."  Interestingly enough though, you could also do the sign "SLOW" very quickly and it would still mean "very slow."  I know that sounds like a contradiction, but think in terms of real language use. If I'm chatting with someone and I want to say that the bus was very slow this morning I don't want to have to take 3 our 4 seconds to inflect the sign slow to mean "very slow." So instead I simply intensify the meaning of the sign "SLOW" by doing it in an intense manner (faster, larger, a slight pause on the initial hold of the sign).

ASL also uses facial expressions and body posture to modify the meaning of signs. 

For example think of the way your lips and teeth look just at the moment when you are starting to say a word that starts with "th."  Notice how your tongue is sticking up against your lower lip with your mouth open a but and the upper teeth pressing down on the tongue?  Go ahead and try that.  Also, tilt your head to the side and back a bit.  Let's call the the "TH" expression.  Facial expressions and body language other than signs are often called "nonmanual markers" (NMM).  When you use the "TH"  NMM  while doing a sign you are modifying meaning of that sign to indicate that it was done in a careless manner.

Pursed lips with a furrowed brow means "intensely."

Lower lip puffed out a bit, head tilted back, content look on your face means "routine or normal."

"CHA" A facial expression that looks like you are saying the word "CHA" is often used to indicate that something is big or immense.
 


Discussion:

Conceptually Accurate Signs:   This topic, "conceptually accurate signs" is important for students to understand.  Students are learning ASL as a second language. For most ASL students, English is their first language. There is not a one-to-one match between English and ASL (Newell, 1983). Students need to be careful not to let their first language intrude upon their second language.  [Reference: Newell, W., & National Technical Institute for the Deaf. (1983). Basic sign communication. Silver Spring, Md: National Association of the Deaf.]

Suppose you recently watched an inspiring movie and you wanted to sign, "I was really moved by the main character's death scene."  You should choose your signs according to what you mean rather than finding the English word in an ASL vocabulary list and then signing that ASL sign.  For example, consider the word "move" in the sentence above.  If you go to a typical ASL vocabulary list and find the word "MOVE" and use that sign in your sentence you will have missed the concept.  The sign labeled "MOVE" expresses the concept of "picking something up changing its location, and then setting it down again."  It also can be used for concepts like "relocate  to a new house."  But it doesn't mean inspire.  We use a different sign for inspire.  Another example of using conceptually accurate signs would be if you were telling a story about a "butterfly" you would not sign "butter" and "fly" but you'd use the ASL sign for "BUTTERFLY." 

If a person signs using conceptually accurate ASL signs but uses English syntax (word order) they aren't really "signing ASL." Instead what they are doing might be called "contact signing."  Or if they add Signed English prefixes and suffixes, use initialization more heavily, mouth English, and use specific English signs when there is no equivalent ASL sign (instead of just spelling the concept or using a different way of expressing the concept) that would be called "Conceptually Accurate Signed English (CASE)."  Conceptually Accurate Signed English is similar to "contact signing" except that when using CASE you also add Signed English prefixes and suffixes, use initialization more heavily, mouth English, and use specific English signs when there is no equivalent ASL sign. 

References:
Newell, W., & National Technical Institute for the Deaf. (1983). Basic Sign Communication. Silver Spring, Md: National Association of the Deaf.
 


For a practice quiz, visit: Lesson 25 Practice Quiz:
Check with your instructor or your syllabus regarding any graded quizzes for this lesson.

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End of lesson.  Please move on to the next lesson.


Curriculum revision notes and lesson archive:
In a never ending effort to improve, this website is under constant construction

Below are sentences and or signs which are being phased out of this lesson as well as other material that may be phased into the lesson.

Old  sentence: YOUR MOM ADDRESS 73 EAST 400 NORTH? = Does your mom live at 73 East 400 North?

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Notes: 9MM8C76M5C43
9,876,543
WHEN YOU DO NUMBERS IN A SERIES THEY ARE PALM FORWARD.
1 THROUGH 5 ARE NORMALLY PALM BACK WHEN DONE IN ISOLATION.